Laidlaw Case Sheds Some Light on a Complex Relationship

I’ve always been interested in the medical field. I suffered a rather bad accident when I was young, and I’m often taken aback by the fact that my recovery was only possible because of the amazing medical innovations which we often take for granted. But I never really gave much thought into how those research projects are funded until I stumbled on a seemingly unconnected legal case.

The case involves an investment bank called Laidlaw and Company. But what ties it into medicine is the fact that they were funding a research firm called Relmada Therapeutics. Relmada, in turn, had been working on a new medicine to treat chronic pain. And this is all tied together under a new temporary restraining order and associated injunction against Laidlaw. It was the opinion of the court that Laidlaw had been deliberately spreading misleading information about the case. All of this served as a fascinating view into just how a medical treatment goes from idea to reality.

However, I was still left with a lot of questions about the case. I decided that the next step would be to check on Laidlaw. And I have to say that what I saw really did surprise me. The first thing which caught my eye was the sheer history of the firm. They’d actually been around since the 1840s. Even a hundred years or so after that would still make them a respectable age. I really don’t think that a disreputable company could last that long.

The other thing which caught my eye was of a more personal nature. Two of the senior executives involved with the case, Matthew Eitner and James Ahern, were highly represented on the Laidlaw site. And they were the bridge which linked everything together. Both showed a tremendous altruistic spirit. Both in terms of investing in other medical endeavors and working with charities. It impressed me just as much as Laidlaw’s history did.